It’s Not How Many That Matters

A lively group discussion, an intimate tête-à-tête, an inner monologue — in your view, when it comes to a good conversation, what’s the ideal number of people?

Thus goes a  writing prompt on Word Press’ The Daily Post sometime ago…and as I ponder, I find not one right number of people to include in a meaningful conversation. It depends perhaps on the purpose or setting.

For instance, in social gatherings in the family, or in school, or at work, the more, the merrier seems to be a good dictum to follow. But then one should not expect a meaningful exchange of ideas, thoughts or feelings…it’s just an avenue to keep up with each other, or feel/pretend like one belongs, not as an intruder or outcast. Sometimes big social events have this intimidating effect on me.

Mostly in this setting, it’s more fun to observe where the ball is rolling. Listen carefully and one isn’t sure if she can get the flow..each seems to be waiting to throw their own ball in this verbal ping-pong interaction that often results in a cacophony of voices that falter to meaningless ‘Ohs’, ‘ahs’ ‘uhmmmms I see’…Anyone can just drift in or out…And no one seems to mind. Have you ever experienced something like this. Did it also make you feel awkward?

A lively group discussion can be had though when there’s a meeting of the minds – no matter what the topic or where the discussion takes place — at home over dinner, in the classroom, in the gym, on the street corner — you can sense people in the group are having a great time debating, arguing, or simply exchanging views, because each one listens and responds accordingly, and each has learned something. That’s the biggest take away.

Hence, I’d say it’s not really how many people that matters to make a conversation good or meaningful. For as long as each participant gets into the flow, each voice speaks up, each gives a listening ear, making everyone feel good about themselves and the interactive moment, then it’s good, for it brings out the best in each in the group.


A Poem at Dawn

Sometimes, the Muses come visiting at unexpected moments, just like in the early hours this morning. Thus this reflection-poem of mine came to be.

I

 Waking up at dawn

 I see darkness around

 Only flickering lights

 Beaming from buildings afar

 Cast a shimmering glow

 to everything below

 For a second I wonder –

Who’d need the stars?

 Nothing ever though

 can Overshadow

 the Wondrous shine from

 Those heavenly bodies…

 Yet

 in that hour,

Blackness covers the sky.

 II

Sleep still tugging at me

 I recline on the seat

 By the window

 and turn my gaze

 at the sleeping city

beneath my feet…

Everything is still

 Everything quiet

 Save for the rumblings

 in my mind

 which I quell

by my Prayers

III

Gazing by the window

I wonder

Could there be any other soul

Brooding as I do

Over the vast view

of our side of the metropolis…

Or perhaps someone

from his own window

Watching me

Watching the world outside?

Finding Beauty in the Mundane

I enjoy looking at beautiful landscapes. They make for great photographs, especially sweeping panoramas – of mountains, fields, the sea.

Yet, as I spend more time developing my photography skills, I discover so much beauty in the mundane as well.

Silver, one among the greens in my tiny garden
Playing with angles and light and texture
While others may pull weeds from their plot, I simply let them be, including the blur.

Textured layer

“I have always been caught by the pull of the unremarkable, by the easily missed, infinitely nourishing beauty of the mundane.”
Tana French, Broken Harbour

 

 

The Pavement: 3 Perfect Shots

Afternoon Scene #8 - I took this photo of a pavement inside a mall...

Same pavement, another shot…

Afternoon Scene #9
Afternoon Scene #10 - Interesting play of light and shadow on the pavement.

Overall, I wanted to capture a sense of motion when I took these shots one after the other. One pavement, three perfect shots, I hope.

Writing 201: Water Haikus

Haiku 1: Moving On

been a while since

I posted on my site

the Well runs dry…

Day is calm

The blue waters beckon

Pen in hand

Image Source

 Haiku 2: Freshness

Early morning dew

Saddled on life’s newborn leaf

Eaglet in the sky

    Image Source

      Haiku 3: Reborn

Heaven’s blessing

the Waters of Baptism

Soul’s new life

Image Source

 Today’s poetry challenge on The Daily Post’s Writing 201 involves writing about Water (prompt), and/or a haiku (form), and/or use a simile (device).

Love’s Fading Season

the Heart sees no reason

yet understands and answers

Life’s greatest puzzles;

Kindred spirits speak

a language that

goes beyond time and space…

Love's Fading Season...

We could have been

kindred spirits;

there was a time when

we were…

but you, just like the seasons,

have drifted away

into Winter…

Special Note about my photo: I was inspired to use this ‘photo failure’ of mine, a result of an out-of-focus shot…but seeing it still looked good , especially as a background, I decided to keep it in my files…and that was what I used for this post. I credit Photography 101 for all the creative tips I’ve learned from the team! Thanks and Cheers!

Through the Looking Glass…

It took me so long to come up with a response to this photography assignment: “incorporating glass into an image to add a layer of complexity.” Thus it was a blessing I and my family got to dine in a restaurant with this fascinating view of the outside…

Through a glass panel - The sharp lines and striking view of the buildings beyond, plus the soft twirls of the clouds in the sky, were made clearer by using more contrast and color saturation.
Through a glass panel 2 - same view but at a slightly different angle...
Through a glass panel 3 - I included more of the street below...
Through a glass panel 4 - stronger colors...

I never thought taking pictures through a looking glass can be interesting; now I’m hooked, thanks to The Daily Post’s Photography 101 course. Cheers!

Photography 101: Clouds and Convergence