3 Life Lessons from Photography

Indeed, “Life is like photography.” As another oft-quoted line goes, “You use /need the negatives to develop.” 

 

This truth struck me while watching the early morning scene outside the window.

 

Truly, there’s beauty in an image or in the scene before you – when there’s a balanced rendering of light and shadow. A captured image or the real scene before you is rendered more beautiful with its shadows – making it more dramatic or captivating.

In life, light and shadow are both essential – light being the good, positive things we experience, and shadow being the bad, negative ones. Without our ups and downs, we cannot truly grow.

It’s during our lowest point do we learn fresh insights, gain more wisdom – all these helping us to get up and move on. To let us rise up from the ashes of our ‘decay’ and fly again like a phoenix.

Our lowest-point experiences: the sad, bitter, painful life situations; the struggles and frustrations – all these make us appreciate our good times, our blessings, our gifts which we often fail to consider when we’re happy or content; when everything’s in our favor.

Our sufferings can motivate us to become better persons. They can also lead us to be more appreciative of ourselves – with all our light and shadows, as well: the good and bad aspects in us, that make up who we are.

My daily practice with my camera — shooting scenes of nature, the urban landscape, people, house pets, and objects – has sharpened my power of observation, letting me notice more keenly even the minutest of details, such as the slant of shadows as sunlight strikes the earth at different hours of the day.

What fascinates me most is the constant change in the way the same scenes before me are being played out second after second, minute by minute, hour after hour, day in day out.

Each passing time brings about change — slight or dramatic — depending on how light and shadow fall on anyone, anything around me. I’ve developed a keener awareness of what’s happening in my immediate environment all because I’ve learned to use my power of observation.

In the process, I’m discovering, learning more new things. Indeed, there’s so much beauty around.

Most clear – all the beauty I see around does not stay that way all the time!

Nothing’s permanent no matter how beautiful it is. So are the negative things in our lives and in ourselves.

Three important lessons we can derive from this:

  • First, we shouldn’t be too attached to anything in life, not even with the people in our lives.

Too much attachment can only cause more pain, more frustration – because it makes us expect or demand more. Just. Let. Be. A much wiser thing to do.

  • Second, we should not despair over the worst in ourselves, for there’s always HOPE for us to become better. And the sad, painful, or bad things that happen? All these, too, shall pass away.

Besides, our negative experiences make us stronger, wiser, more mature. These are opportunities we can use to grow into the finest version of ourselves and learn how to better handle such situations. Each of our life experiences is a time of discovering the truth of ourselves — the good, the bad, the ugly.

  • Finally, discovering our truth, we can choose to highlight the beauty and goodness within us because after all, we are truly beautiful creatures of God, who made us in His likeness and being. Just like how seemingly ugly a landscape is, when light is cast upon it, its beauty shines or it becomes more attractive.

Still, we need to recognize our weak points, so we can overcome these, and let our innate beauty as human persons shine.

Realizing both the good and the bad in us, we see ourselves in a better perspective, in a better light. We grow to understand, accept, and love ourselves more.

And this is how we learn to view, appreciate, and love others as well.

On Reinventing Oneself

“If you are not where you want to be, do not quit; instead reinvent yourself and change your habits.” — Eric Thomas

The topic of reinventing oneself came casually over me – as I went through some previous posts of mine and read my revised “About My Blog” page here. I had thought of just giving up this blog, for it had outgrown its initial purpose.

But time and again, I would back off, do a little bit of tweaking here and there, just to keep it going, even if I’ve not been able to capture a loyal following. Just to see how far it can go, learning to see in what ways my blog can inspire or uplift or share something valuable to readers — beyond merely serving as my personal creative platform. Continue reading “On Reinventing Oneself”

Repetition and Change

A great part of me enjoys repetition. I feel comfortable with the tried and tested pattern of my everyday life, yet I also yearn for change every now and then. I try to strike a balance between the old and the new.

a church's domed ceiling with patterns of repetition
a church’s domed ceiling with patterns of repetition

Image Source

3 Ways To Deal with Change

 

In my previous post, “Change: How To Deal with It” I shared 3 ways by which you can deal with unexpected changes in your life, to wit:

1) Be ready to accept the change, and embrace it for all it is worth.

2) Look at any change in your life as a reflective, learning moment.

3) Focus on and gather your inner and outer resources.

Life's twists and turns

Let us take a look at each of these more closely.

Accept and embrace change

Live each day with openness to all possibilities that may unfold before you. This is not to say you should not hope for or anticipate with eagerness the good that you desire to happen in your life. Yes, live each day with hope in your heart, but give space to the thought that change is inevitable: there are events in life that do happen when you least expect them; there are dreams you have carefully planned for that do not turn out as you like it. And of course, there are the unexpected joys that bring in change, a welcome surprising change that makes adapting to it a lot easier.

How can you accept and embrace change? Continue reading “3 Ways To Deal with Change”